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The Archaeology News Network

There and back again: Mantle xenon has a story to tell

The Earth has been through a lot of changes in its 4.5 billion year history, including a shift to start incorporating and retaining volatile compounds from the atmosphere in the mantle before spewing them out again through volcanic eruptions. Mt. Etna spews lava during an eruption as seen from Acireale, near the Sicilian town of Catania, Italy [Credit: AP/Carmelo Imbesi]This …Continue reading →

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New species of rare ancient ‘worm’ discovered in fossil hotspot

Scientists have discovered a new species of lobopodian, an ancient relative of modern-day velvet worms, in 430 million-years-old Silurian rocks in Herefordshire, UK. Scientists have discovered a new species of lobopodian, an ancient relative of modern-day velvet worms [Credit: Derek Siveter et al.]The team, comprising researchers from the universities of Oxford, Yale, Leicester and Manchester, and Imperial College London, has …Continue reading →

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Hybridization boosts evolution

Animals that have either migrated to or been introduced in Central Europe – such as the Asian bush mosquito or the Asian ladybeetle – feel extremely comfortable in their new homes due to changing climatic conditions. If these newcomers are genetically compatible with local species, they may crossbreed and produce hybrids, which can continue to evolve under local environmental conditions …Continue reading →

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For the first time, scientists are putting extinct mammals on the map

Researchers from Aarhus University and University of Gothenburg have produced the most comprehensive family tree and atlas of mammals to date, connecting all living and recently extinct mammal species — nearly 6,000 in total — and overturning many previous ideas about global patterns of biodiversity. The thylacine, or Tasmanian tiger, is a marsupial predator that was last seen alive in …Continue reading →

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The Umov Effect: Space dust clouds and the mysteries of the universe

FEFU scientists are developing a methodology to calculate the ratio of dust and gas in comas and tails of comets. This will help learn more about the history of the Solar System and its development, as well as understand the processes that took part on different stages of universal evolution. This is Comet17P/Holmes seen by the Hubble Space Telescope [Credit: …Continue reading →

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Those fragrances you enjoy? Dinosaurs liked them first

The compounds behind the perfumes and colognes you enjoy have been eliciting olfactory excitement since dinosaurs walked the Earth amid the first appearance of flowering plants, new research reveals. Glandular laurel in amber [Credit: Oregon State University]Oregon State University entomologist George Poinar Jr. and his son Greg, a fragrance collector, found evidence that floral scents originated in primitive flowers as …Continue reading →

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Largest haul of extrasolar planets for Japan

Forty-four planets in solar systems beyond our own have been unveiled in one go, dwarfing the usual number of confirmations from extrasolar surveys, which is typically a dozen or less. The findings will improve our models of solar systems and may help researchers investigate exoplanet atmospheres. Novel techniques developed to validate the find could hugely accelerate the confirmation of more …Continue reading →

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Mojave birds crashed over last century due to climate change

Bird communities in the Mojave Desert straddling the California/Nevada border have collapsed over the past 100 years, most likely because of lower rainfall due to climate change, according to a new University of California, Berkeley, study. Cactus wren [Credit: Chelsea Hofmeier]A three-year survey of the area, which is larger than the state of New York, concludes that 30 percent, or …Continue reading →

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Million fold increase in the power of waves near Jupiter’s moon Ganymede

Listening to electro-magnetic waves around the Earth, converted to sound, is almost like listening to singing and chirping birds at dawn with a crackling camp fire nearby. This is why such waves are called chorus waves. They cause polar lights but also high-energy ‘killer’ electrons that can damage spacecraft. In a recent study to be published in Nature Communications, the …Continue reading →

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Rediscovering the sources of Egyptian metals

Two new studies, published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, offer the first comprehensive analytical datasets of Protodynastic to Old Kingdom Egyptian copper-based artifacts (c. 3rd millennium BC), analyzing the provenance of Egyptian copper. As elaborated in a methodological comment, the studies constitute an important step forward in current knowledge on copper provenance and the subsequent economic, social and cultural… …Continue reading →

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