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Art

World’s oldest fishing net sinkers found in S. Korea

Archaeologists excavating a cave in South Korea have found evidence that suggests human beings were using sophisticated techniques to catch fish as far back as 29,000 years ago, much earlier than experts previously thought. The limestone sinkers, each weighing between 14 to 52 grammes, would have been tied to the bottom of nets and used to catch small fish such …Continue reading →

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Burial mound in Kazakhstan yields remains of ‘golden man’ dating back to 8th century BC

Archaeologists working in the remote Tarbagatai Mountains in East Kazakhstan have discovered a ‘golden man’ mummy dating back to the 8th-7th centuries B.C. in the Yeleke Sazy burial mound. Credit: akimat of the East Kazakhstan region”Anthropologists say the mound is a burial place of a young man aged from 17 to 18 who was some 165-170 centimeters tall. All the …Continue reading →

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Earth at risk of heading towards ‘hothouse Earth’ state

Keeping global warming to within 1.5-2°C may be more difficult than previously assessed, according to researchers. A study published in PNAS shows that there is a risk of Earth entering “Hothouse Earth” conditions where the climate  in the long term will stabilize at a global average of 4-5°C higher than pre-industrial temperatures and sea level 10-60 m higher than today …Continue reading →

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Discovery of copper band shows Native Americans engaged in trade more extensively than thought

A research team including Matthew Sanger, assistant professor of anthropology at Binghamton University, State University at New York, has found a copper band that indicates ancient Native Americans engaged in extensive trade networks spanning far greater distances than what has been previously thought. These are excavations recovering copper band from site in coastal Georgia [Credit: Matthew Sanger]”Our research shows that …Continue reading →

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Chronostratigraphic framework established for fluvial valleys of the eastern Cantabrian margin

For the first time, a preliminary chronostratigraphic framework has been established for three Cantabrian river basins through the direct dating of Quaternary fluvial deposits, whose results contribute to reconstructing how these basins have evolved over the last 400,000 years The Oiartzun river channel today [Credit: Miren del Val]An international team, including the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana… …Continue reading →

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Sequenced fox genome hints at genetic basis of behaviour

For nearly 60 years, the red fox has been teaching scientists about animal behavior. In a long-term experiment, foxes at the Russian Institute of Cytology and Genetics have been selected for tameness or aggression, recreating the process of domestication from wolves to modern dogs in real time. Today, with the first-ever publication of the fox genome, scientists will begin to …Continue reading →

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Mosquito populations give a new insight into the role of Caucasus in evolution

We know that the Caucasus is a relatively large mountainous region, situated between Black and the Caspian seas. In its turn, it is divided into three subregions: Ciscaucasia, Greater Caucasus and Transcaucasia, also known as South Caucasus. The chromosomes of Chironomus ‘annularius’ sensu Strenzke (1959) [Credit: Dr Mukhamed Karmokov]A closer look into the chromosome structure of mosquito larvae of a …Continue reading →

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First North American co-occurrence of Hadrosaur and Therizinosaur tracks found in Alaska

An international team of paleontologists and other geoscientists has discovered the first North American co-occurrence of hadrosaur and therizinosaur tracks in the lower Cantwell Formation within Denali National Park, suggesting that an aspect of the continental ecosystem of central Asia was also present in this part of Alaska during the Late Cretaceous. An international team of paleontologists and geoscientists has …Continue reading →

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VLA detects possible extrasolar planetary-mass magnetic powerhouse

Astronomers using the National Science Foundation’s Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) have made the first radio-telescope detection of a planetary-mass object beyond our Solar System. The object, about a dozen times more massive than Jupiter, is a surprisingly strong magnetic powerhouse and a “rogue,” traveling through space unaccompanied by any parent star. Artist’s conception of SIMP J01365663+0933473, an …Continue reading →

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Researchers uncover remnants of early solar system

Scientists believe the solar system was formed some 4.6 billion years ago when a cloud of gas and dust collapsed under gravity possibly triggered by a cataclysmic explosion from a nearby massive star or supernova. As this cloud collapsed, it formed a spinning disk with the sun in the center. This crustal rock was found in a sand dune in …Continue reading →

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