The Things I Like

John's blog on Art, Technology, design and more!

RSS 2.0

art

Archaeologists in Egypt open large black granite sarcophagus found in Alexandria

Archaeologists in Egypt have opened a large, sealed, black granite sarcophagus dating 2,300 years in the coastal city of Alexandria. Only waterlogged skeletal remains were found in the sarcophagus [Credit: Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities]The discovery, announced earlier this month, triggered speculation in local and international media about its contents. The sarcophagus, which is almost two metres high and three metres …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Neanderthals could make fire – just like our modern ancestors

Neanderthals were able to make fire on a large scale with the aid of pyrite and hand-axes. This means they could decide when and where they wanted fire and were not dependent on natural fire, as was thought earlier. Archaeologist Andrew Sorensen has discovered the first material evidence for this. Neanderthal reconstruction [Credit: Natural History Museum/Allan Henderson]Dependent on natural fire …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Archaeologists find ancient pottery workshop in Egypt

Archaeologists in Egypt have discovered an ancient pottery manufacturing workshop dating to more than 4,000 years ago in the southern province of Aswan, the Antiquities Ministry said Thursday. The 4000-year old pottery workshop that was recently discovered close to the Nile River  in Aswan province, southern Egypt [Credit: Ministry of Antiquities]The workshop, the oldest pottery workshop in the Old Kingdom, …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Research cites faulty science and ethics in DNA analyzes of ‘Ata’

University of Otago-led international collaborative research calls into question the ethics and skeletal and genomic analysis surrounding research into the much publicised alien-like “Atacama mummy”. The Atacama mummy [Credit: Bhattacharya et al. Genome Research, 2018]University of Otago bioarchaeologist Associate Professor Sian Halcrow led an international research team focusing on the very small mummified body, whose findings are… [[ This is …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Barley heads east: Living plant varieties reveal ancient migration routes across Eurasia

The emergence of agriculture is one of the most important transitions in the development of human societies, as it allowed the establishment of settled communities, specialization of labour and technological innovation. Close-ups of two-rowed (Top) and six-rowed (Bottom) hulled barley [Credit: Catherine Kneale]One centre of agricultural origins is the Near East, where barley was domesticated around 10,500 years ago, along …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Life on Earth kept to darkness for much of history, study finds

Tiny creatures that lived in the dark – either underground or below the sea floor – were the dominant life forms on Earth for much of the planet’s history, a study suggests. Life on Earth is thought to have begun around 3.8 billion years ago with single-celled organisms [Credit: University of Aberdeen]Microscopic organisms, including bacteria, were the most abundant forms …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Billion-year-old lake deposit yields clues to Earth’s ancient biosphere

A sample of ancient oxygen, teased out of a 1.4 billion-year-old evaporative lake deposit in Ontario, provides fresh evidence of what the Earth’s atmosphere and biosphere were like during the interval leading up to the emergence of animal life. Credit: McGill UniversityThe findings, published in the journal Nature, represent the oldest measurement of atmospheric oxygen isotopes by nearly a billion …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Great Barrier Reef not bouncing back as before, but there is hope

The Great Barrier Reef is losing its ability to recover from disturbances, but effective local management could revive its capacity to bounce back. Reefs experiencing flood and poor water quality [Credit: Peter Mumby]Scientists at The University of Queensland, The Nature Conservancy, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reefs Studies (Coral CoE) and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) have …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Atlantic circulation is not collapsing – but as it shifts gears, warming will reaccelerate

A huge circulation pattern in the Atlantic Ocean took a starring role in the 2004 movie “The Day After Tomorrow.” In that fictional tale the global oceanic current suddenly stops and New York City freezes over. In the Atlantic Ocean’s part of the global ocean circulation, warmer water travels north at the surface, then sinks in the far northern part …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

In the ocean’s twilight zone, tiny organisms may have giant effect on Earth’s carbon cycle

Deep in the ocean’s twilight zone, swarms of ravenous single-celled organisms may be altering Earth’s carbon cycle in ways scientists never expected, according to a new study from Florida State University researchers. Stukel and his team found that hordes of microorganisms called phaeodarians, depicted above, could be playing an outsized role in the global carbon cycle [Credit: Mike Stukel]In the …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Check out this great gadget!