The Things I Like

John's blog on Art, Technology, design and more!

RSS 2.0

May 2nd, 2018

Carbon announces high-strength EPX 82 and production-scale elastomeric EPU 41 3D printing materials

Pioneering 3D printing company Carbon has added two new materials to its impressive portfolio. EPX 82 is a high-strength epoxy material for engineering purposes, and EPU 41 is perfect for the creation of advanced elastomeric lattice geometries. via 3ders.org, http://www.3ders.org/articles/20180502-carbon-announces-high-strength-epx82-and-production-scale-elastomeric-epu-41-3d-printing-materials.html

Tags: , ,

Posted in 3DPrinting | No Comments »

How to make cheap, scalable multi-material 3D printing with powder deposition process

A recent article published by Aerosint engineers explores the future possibilities for multi-material 3D printing. The ability to fabricate composites with advanced properties, in a scalable and affordable way, would greatly expand the potential of 3D printing technology in manufacturing. via 3ders.org, http://www.3ders.org/articles/20180502-how-to-make-cheap-scalable-multi-material-3d-printing-with-powder-deposition-process.html

Tags: , ,

Posted in 3DPrinting | No Comments »

DNA adds twist to ancient story of Native American group

The ancient genomes of the Tsimshian indigenous people left tell-tale markers on the trail of their past, revealing that at least 6,000 years ago their population size was on a slow but steady decline. Members of the Tsimshian Native American tribe hold a tea party near Fort Simpson, British Columbia, in 1889 [Credit: Library and Archives Canada]The American Journal of …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Dinosaurs’ tooth wear sheds light on their predatory lives

Predatory, bird-like theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous (100.5-66 million years ago) of Spain and Canada all relied on a puncture-and-pull bite strategy to kill and consume their prey. But close examination of patterns of wear and modeling of their serrated, blade-like teeth reported in Current Biology also suggest that these dinosaurs weren’t necessarily in direct competition for their next …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Giant sloth vs. ancient man: fossil footprints track prehistoric hunt

Scientists have uncovered evidence of ancient humans engaged in a deadly face-off with a giant sloth, showing for the first time how our ancestors might have tackled such a formidable prey. Human hunters stalked giant ground sloth to distract them before trying to land a killing blow  [Credit: Alex McCelland/Bournemouth University]Standing over 2 meters tall, with forelegs tipped with claws, …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Agnès Petit wins Isabelle Musy Award for concrete 3D printing startup Mobbot

The 2018 Isabelle Musy Award has gone to the founder of a concrete 3D printing startup. The prize is given to outstanding female entrepreneurs in science and technology, and this year it went to Agnès Petit, whose company Mobbot uses robotics technology to improve the concrete 3D printing process. via 3ders.org, http://www.3ders.org/articles/20180502-agnes-petit-wins-isabelle-musy-award-for-concrete-3d-printing-startup-mobbot.html

Tags: , ,

Posted in 3DPrinting | No Comments »

Scientists set eyes on Neanderthal ‘brain’

Scientists have for the first time set eyes on a three-dimensional Neanderthal brain in the form of a virtual model made to fit the empty, fossilised skulls of long-dead individuals, a study said Thursday. Skulls are displayed as part of the Neanderthal exhibition at the Musee de l’Homme in Paris on March 26, 2018 [Credit: Stephane de Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images]The reconstructed …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Geologists assist in solving the mystery of a gold treasure

The Carambolo Treasure is an assemblage of gold items of the first millennium BCE, whose origin has for about 50 years been the epicentre of a heated debate. New chemical and isotopic analyses, carried out by the UPV/EHU’s Geochronology and Isotopic Geochemistry Service – Ibercron and commissioned by the University of Huelva and the Archaeological Museum of Seville, suggest that …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Scientists find seeds of domestic plants in the burial sites of ancient nomads

An international team of scientists, including a professor of the Faculty of Soil Science, MSU, has studied burial sites dated back to the Bronze Age at the border between Kalmykia and Stavropol Territory and found traces of domestic barley on the walls of vessels. Local residents did not practice agriculture at that time, so the barley was likely received from …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Identifying the use of tinder fungi among neolithic communities at la Draga in Catalonia

Inhabitants of the Neolithic community at la Draga (Banyoles, Girona) already used fungi to light or transport fires 7300 years ago. The discovery represents one of the oldest examples of technological use of fungi documented until now and is the result of several archaeological interventions at the site, which have also yielded an exceptional collection of these organisms, unique in …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Check out this great gadget!