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March 13th, 2018

Future of 3D printed soft robots depends on new innovation in 3DP, soft lithography, RP

Researchers at South Korea's Jeju National University have carried out research into the viability of 3D printed soft robots. The study suggests that obstacles need to be overcome before 3D printing is fully capable of making soft robots at scale. via 3ders.org, http://www.3ders.org/articles/20180313-future-of-3d-printed-soft-robots-depends-on-new-innovation-in-3dp-soft-lithography-rp.html

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Trash cleaning robot controlled by you.

There’s too much trash in the Chicago River. We are building a robot, controlled by you to clean it up! – [currently $33 (1%) of $5,000 goal] via Technology (latest) :: Kicktraq, http://www.kicktraq.com/projects/1996859969/trash-cleaning-robot-controlled-by-you/

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Large Roman cemetery discovered at Netherlelands highway site

A secret dig at the site of a new section of the A15 motorway has yielded a large Roman cemetery but no clues as to the provenance of its occupants, government roads department RWS announced this week. Archaeologists excavate the Roman cemetery [Credit: Rijkswaterstaat]The find, in a field at Bemmel near Zevenaar, dates from the 2nd or 3rd century AD …Continue reading →

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New Pompeii district to be uncovered

An entire quarter of the ancient Roman city of Pompeii is set to be uncovered using drones, lasers and virtual reality, the director-general of the site, Massimo Osanna, said Friday. View of the unexplored Regio V district [Credit: Parco Archeologico di Pompei]The new hi-tech digs will take place to the north of the already discovered city, an area that has …Continue reading →

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Researchers fired up after finding kiln for ancient Japanese temple

A kiln apparently used to bake tiles for the roof of Toshodaiji temple, a UNESCO World Heritage Site here, offers new hints into the craftsmanship that went into creating the magnificent structures more than 1,000 years ago. Remains of a tile kiln unearthed from the grounds of Toshodaiji temple in Nara [Credit: Kazushige Kobayashi]The Archaeological Institute of Kashihara, Nara Prefecture, …Continue reading →

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Making metal, casting society at the Cairns, Orkney

Martin Carruthers, Site Director at The University of the Highlands and Islands Archaeology Institute research excavation at The Cairns, Orkney, talks about the latest research findings from the site.  Ring headed pin moulds with cast pin [Credit: University of the Highlands and Islands]“We have been very lucky at The Cairns over the years of the excavations to find a substantial …Continue reading →

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Skulls show women moved across medieval Europe, not just men

The newcomers who arrived in the little farming villages of medieval Germany would have stood out: They had dark hair and tawny skin, spoke a different language and had remarkably tall heads. Skulls unearthed from 1,400-year-old burials in southern Germany may show signs of intensive or moderate skull modification, left and center, which researchers believe is a cultural practice seen …Continue reading →

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Genetic prehistory of Iberia differs from central and northern Europe

In a multidisciplinary study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, an international team of researchers combined archaeological, genetic and stable isotope data to encapsulate 4000 years of Iberian biomolecular prehistory. El Portalón cave in the Sierra de Atapuerca (northern Spain) contains four millennia of biomolecular prehistory [Credit: Eneko Iriarte (Universidad de Burgos)]The team analyzed human remains… [[ …Continue reading →

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Climate change and looters threaten the archaeology of Mongolia

The history and archaeology of Mongolia, most famously the sites associated with the largest land empire in the history of the world under Ghengis Khan, are of global importance. But they’re facing unprecedented threats as climate change and looting impact ancient sites and collections. Burial sites may contain treasures, or just old bones. And looters won’t know until they’ve destroyed …Continue reading →

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Humans thrived in South Africa through the Toba super-volcanic eruption ~74,000 years ago

Imagine a year in Africa that summer never arrives. The sky takes on a gray hue during the day and glows red at night. Flowers do not bloom. Trees die in the winter. Large mammals like antelope become thin, starve and provide little fat to the predators (carnivores and human hunters) that depend on them. Then, this same disheartening cycle …Continue reading →

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