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March 2nd, 2018

7,000-year-old Native American burial site found submerged off Florida

An unexpected discovery by a fossil hunter diving a quarter-mile off Manasota Key near Venice, Florida, has led to a groundbreaking archaeological project that could change everything scientists thought they knew about offshore archaeology. The Manasota Key Offshore (MKO) site will help archaeologists understand how Florida’s indigenous people lived, and what their environment was like over 7,000 years ago. Credit: …Continue reading →

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700-year-old bronze ring bearing image of St. Nicholas discovered in Galilee

A rare and impressive intact bronze ring from the Middle Ages, bearing the image of St. Nicholas, was discovered by chance during recent landscaping work in the garden of a home in the Jezreel Valley community of Moshav Hayogev. St. Nicholas is best known as the source of the beloved, gift-giving Christmas figure of Santa Claus. To date, there is …Continue reading →

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Roman-era sarcophagus found at Istanbul high school construction site

A Roman-era sarcophagus, believed to date back 2000 years, has been unearthed during a construction work in Istanbul’s Kadıköy district, daily Habertürk has reported. Credit: Hurriyet Daily NewsOfficials at the Istanbul Archaeology Museum Directorate found human bones inside the sarcophagus after conducting an examination in the area. The lid of the sarcophagus was found in a different place. The tomb …Continue reading →

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Umayyad-era sunken marine port discovered in Aqaba Gulf

A sunken marine port structure in the Gulf of Aqaba was unveiled on Monday as findings of Jordan’s first underwater archaeological expedition tracing ruins of the Islamic city of Ayla were announced. Jordan’s first underwater archaeological expedition traced ruins of the Islamic city of Ayla in the Gulf of Aqaba [Credit: JREDS]The unearthed port dates back to the Umayyad period …Continue reading →

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Shelters with echoes thought to be preferred sites for prehistoric rock art

The acoustic qualities of a rock shelter may have been a key factor in its selection as a site for rock art and indicate a spiritual significance to the practice, according to a recent study, while scientists are also looking into whether some caves were chosen as artistic sites because of the view. Scientists believe that rock art sites were …Continue reading →

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Parts of Ramses II statue found in southern Egypt

Egypt says archaeologists have discovered parts of a statue of one of its most famous pharaohs in the southern city of Aswan. The head of a statue of one of the most famous pharaohs, Ramses II, that was discovered along with other parts of a statue in the Temple of Kom Ombo, in Aswan, 940 kilometres south of Cairo [Credit: Egyptian …Continue reading →

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Human dispersion through southern Europe in Early Pleistocene

Geochronologists from the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH) have led a study published in the journal Quaternary Geochronology about the chronology of the archaeological site of Gran Dolina, situated in the Sierra de Atapuerca (Burgos), whose results confirm a pulse of human dispersion in southern Europe around one million years ago.. TD4 Level at Gran Dolina …Continue reading →

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Modern volcanism tied to events occurring soon after Earth’s birth

Plumes of hot magma from the volcanic hotspot that formed Réunion Island in the Indian Ocean rise from an unusually primitive source deep beneath Earth’s surface, according to new work in Nature from Carnegie’s Bradley Peters, Richard Carlson, and Mary Horan along with James Day of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. A fieldwork photo from Réunion Island shows the flank …Continue reading →

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Flipside of a dinosaur mystery: ‘Bloat-and-float’ explains belly-up ankylosaur fossils

A scientist with the Canadian Museum of Nature has answered a long-standing mystery about why fossils of ankylosaurs — the “armoured tanks” of the dinosaur world — are mainly found belly-side up. In doing so, he has ruled out three other competing theories involving clumsiness, predation, and the effects of bloating as seen in armadillo roadkills. Illustration of Euoplocephalus, an …Continue reading →

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Miniscule flightless birds have lived in New Zealand’s wetlands for millions of years

Fossilized bones of two new species of tiny, flightless extinct birds have been discovered by Australasian scientists in 19 to 16-million-year-old sediments of an ancient lake on the South Island of New Zealand. A tiny extinct rail (30-40g) is overshadowed by a regular duck  [Credit: Gavin Mouldey]The two miniscule species—one barely larger than a sparrow—were members of the rail family, …Continue reading →

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