The Things I Like

John's blog on Art, Technology, design and more!

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February 2nd, 2018

FPV Tank Robot

Make a tank with robot arms and FPV system. Companies can order for work / inspection under brackets for example. – [currently kr0 (0%) of kr10,000 goal] via Technology (latest) :: Kicktraq, http://www.kicktraq.com/projects/683217085/fpv-tank-robot/

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Deakin University experiments with customized 3D printed food for people with swallowing disorders

We’re all familiar with the experience of food being tricky to swallow, whether it’s fish, cheese or something else entirely. But what if not being able to swallow your food was a serious health problem, as opposed to just an occasional mealtime inconvenience? via 3ders.org, http://www.3ders.org/articles/20180202-deakin-university-experiments-with-customized-3d-printed-food-for-swallowing-disorders.html

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Mapping the Maya: Laser technology reveals secrets of an ancient civilization

The steamy jungles of northern Guatemala don’t reveal secrets easily. For centuries, the overgrown landscape has protected most of the remains of the Maya who once tamed it—yielding slowly to modern scientists seeking to learn more about the ancient civilization known for its sophisticated hieroglyphic script, art, architecture and mathematics. Maya structures are scattered across the jungle in this LiDAR …Continue reading →

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Solving the puzzle of multicellularity

One of the big evolutionary questions in life is how and why single cell organisms organised themselves to live in a group, thereby forming multicellular life forms. The muliticellular algae, Tetrabaena socialis [Credit: Hisayoshi Nozaki and Yoko Arakaki]Wits PhD student, Jonathan Featherston, of the Evolution of Complexity Laboratory at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, has answered at least part …Continue reading →

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Radiocarbon dating reveals mass grave did date to the Viking age

A team of archaeologists, led by Cat Jarman from the University of Bristol’s Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, has discovered that a mass grave uncovered in the 1980s dates to the Viking Age and may have been a burial site of the Viking Great Army war dead. One of the female skulls from the Repton charnel [Credit: Cat Jarman]Although the …Continue reading →

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Scandinavians shaped by several waves of immigration

Directly following the last ice age, people from the western parts of what is now Norway were a population that had substantially different genetics from the people living in the area corresponding to present-day Sweden. Anne-Marian Snaaijer, a PhD candidate at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology works in Trondheim’s Archive Centre at Dora. The collection trays hold lots …Continue reading →

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New research suggests toward end of Ice Age, human beings witnessed fires larger than dinosaur killers

On a ho-hum day some 12,800 years ago, the Earth had emerged from another ice age. Things were warming up, and the glaciers had retreated. Out of nowhere, the sky was lit with fireballs. This was followed by shock waves. New research shows that some 12,800 years ago, an astonishing 10 percent of the Earth’s land surface, or about 10 …Continue reading →

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Egypt starts radar scans for secret rooms behind Tutankhamun’s tomb

Egypt’s Antiquities Ministry says archaeologists are starting radar scans of the tomb of famed pharaoh Tutankhamun in the southern city of Luxor. Tutankhamun’s tomb [Credit: EPA]The ministry said Thursday the scans will be carried out over a week to check for the existence of any hidden chambers behind the tomb. Egypt carried out previous scans as part of the quest …Continue reading →

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Slow but steady: New study sheds light on the brain evolution of turtles

A new study led by the University of Birmingham shows that the brain of turtles has evolved slowly, but constantly over the last 210 million years, eventually reaching a variety in form and complexity, which rivals that of other animal groups. The image shows a reconstruction of Proganochelys (the oldest turtle with a complete shell) as it would have appeared …Continue reading →

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Arctic lakes are releasing relatively young carbon, study discovers

When Arctic permafrost soil thaws, greenhouse gases are released into the atmosphere, but most of the carbon currently escaping from lakes in northern Alaska is relatively young, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Irvine. Alaska’s North Slope is dotted with a diverse array of lakes. UCI researchers recently learned that the greenhouse gases …Continue reading →

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