The Things I Like

John's blog on Art, Technology, design and more!

RSS 2.0

February 1st, 2018

Noumena’s Robotic Habitats with 3D printed robots explores the evolution of artificial intelligence

Noumena, an innovative Barcelona-based group of engineers, designers, and architects, is investigating how artificial intelligence and robots might evolve and survive in our world through a recent (partially 3D printed) installation called “Robotic Habitats.” via 3ders.org, http://www.3ders.org/articles/20180201-noumenas-robotic-habitats-with-3d-printed-robots-explores-the-evolution-of-artificial-intelligence.html

Tags: , ,

Posted in 3DPrinting | No Comments »

Eclipse predicts additional $1M revenue within three years with new Massivit 1800 3D printer

Columbus (OH)-based creative design company, Eclipse Corp. has invested in a Massivit 1800 3D Printing Solution to drive new business and differentiate its service offering against traditional print company competitors. via 3ders.org, http://www.3ders.org/articles/20180201-eclipse-predicts-additional-revenue-within-three-years-with-new-massivit-1800-3d-printer.html

Tags: , ,

Posted in 3DPrinting | No Comments »

Fossil evidence shows bats colonized from islands to continents

Plants and animals are generally thought to colonize from continents to islands, over time leading to the evolution of separate island species. Scientists have theorized that the reverse – colonizing from islands to continents – seems unlikely, mainly because the few competitors on islands make thriving on the mainland difficult for island specialists. But a new study published in the …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Clues from an endangered blue whale population

Clues in the DNA of endangered blue whales – the largest living animal – has shown that Australia is home to one population that likely travels widely and is adapted to a range of environmental conditions. Credit: Flinders UniversityBlue whales are at this moment in Australian waters taking advantage of the abundance of krill that occurs during the summer. They …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Bryozoans, brachiopods, and phoronida originate from the common ancestor

A biologist from Lomonosov Moscow State University has studied the nervous system of the adult phoronida using modern methods and presented new facts regarding the taxonomy of invertebrates, proving that phoronids, barchiopods and bryozoans are relatives contrary to earlier conclusions. The results of the work were published in Scientific Reports. Different types of animals from the Lophophorata group. From left …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

A mutational timer is built into the chemistry of DNA

If you had to copy billions of letters from one sheet of paper to another, you’d probably make a few mistakes. So it might not come as a surprise that when DNA makes a copy of its three-billion-base genetic code, it can slip up too. DNA bases can shape-shift for a thousandth of a second, briefly morphing into alternative states …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

First study of the only original preserved fossils of Peking Man

Scientists from the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH) form part of the team which has just published a paper in the journal Scientific Reports, studying for the first time the original fossil remains conserved of “Peking Man.” These six teeth belonging to Homo erectus were found in the mid-twentieth century at the Middle Pleistocene archaeological site …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Reconstructing an ancient lethal weapon

Archaeologists are a little like forensic investigators: They scour the remains of past societies, looking for clues in pottery, tools and bones about how people lived, and how they died. University of Washington researchers re-created ancient projectile points to test their effectiveness. From left to right: stone, microblade and bone tips [Credit: Janice Wood]And just as detectives might re-create the …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Evolution of China’s flowering plants shows East-West divide between old, new lineages

An international team of scientists has mapped the evolutionary relationships between China’s 30,000 flowering plant species, uncovering a distinct regional pattern in biodiversity. Eastern China is a floral “museum” with a rich array of ancient lineages and distant relatives while the western provinces are an evolutionary “cradle” for newer and more closely related species. New research shows that eastern China …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Stone tools in India suggest earlier human exit from Africa

Just a week after scientists reported evidence that our species left Africa earlier than we thought, another discovery is suggesting the date might be pushed back further. Levallois core from Attirampakkam, India, is the product of a stone tool-making strategy for obtaining thin, broad flakes from a chunk of rock [Credit: Sharma Centre for Heritage Education, India]Homo sapiens arose in …Continue reading →

Tags: ,

Posted in art | No Comments »

Check out this great gadget!