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January 30th, 2018

Sanitary fittings giant Grohe implements 3D printing for new line of advanced bathroom fittings

3D printing with ceramics is one particularly interesting and fruitful growth area, as these materials have a variety of different applications in a broad range of fields. Their high heat-resistance means that they are regularly used in aerospace or other high-performance industrial components, while their durability and surface qualities also makes them ideal for dental implants as well as pottery …Continue reading →

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Northern European population history revealed by ancient human genomes

An international team of scientists, led by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, analyzed ancient human genomes from 38 northern Europeans dating from approximately 7,500 to 500 BCE. The study, published in Nature Communications, found that Scandinavia was initially settled via a southern and a northern route and that the arrival of agriculture in …Continue reading →

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Coral lifestyles reflected in their genes

The first comparative genome study between two corals reveals significant evolutionary differences. These findings could help scientists understand the resilience of corals and how they might respond to climate change. KAUST researchers have sequenced the genome of the robust coral Stylophora pistillata. Comparisons with another coral  species demonstrates that the two are far more genetically diverse than anticipated [Credit:… [[ …Continue reading →

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Mammals and birds could have best shot at surviving climate change

New research that analyzed more than 270 million years of data on animals shows that mammals and birds — both warm-blooded animals — may have a better chance of evolving and adapting to the Earth’s rapidly changing climate than their cold-blooded peers, reptiles and amphibians. Credit: Flickr, fritzcat”We see that mammals and birds are better able to stretch out and …Continue reading →

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Scientists pinpoint how ocean acidification weakens coral skeletons

The rising acidity of the oceans threatens coral reefs by making it harder for corals to build their skeletons. A new study identifies the details of how ocean acidification affects coral skeletons, allowing scientists to predict more precisely where corals will be more vulnerable. Corals grow their skeletons upward toward sunlight and also thicken them to reinforce them. A thriving …Continue reading →

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Astrochemists reveal the magnetic secrets of methanol

A team of scientists, led by Boy Lankhaar at Chalmers University of Technology, has solved an important puzzle in astrochemistry: how to measure magnetic fields in space using methanol, the simplest form of alcohol. Their results, published in the journal Nature Astronomy, give astronomers a new way of investigating how massive stars are born. Magnetic fields play an important role …Continue reading →

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Bone experts offer how-to video for forensic professionals

Advances in recent years allow forensic practitioners to use bone mineral density to extract more information from human remains – but many forensic experts are unfamiliar with the techniques and technology. Now forensic researchers from North Carolina State University have published a step-by-step methodology in the video journal JOVE, providing forensic professionals with a guide that can help them extract …Continue reading →

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New evidence shows might of Pharaoh Ramses is fake news

Archaeological evidence from an Egyptian excavation 200 miles east of the Libyan border has helped bust the fearsome reputation of one of the country’s most famous pharaohs. Ramses II [Credit: University of Manchester]Dr Nicky Nielsen, from The University of Manchester, says the Egyptians who lived in the late Bronze Age fortress at of Zawiyet Umm el-Rakham were at peace with …Continue reading →

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China-Bangladesh excavation uncovers the ancient capital of Vikrampur

On January 3, a team of archaeologists from China and Bangladesh announced the results of their four-year excavation of the Vikrampur Ruins in Bangladesh at a special archaeological forum. Aerial view of the excavation site [Credit: Guo Weimin]Located in the Munshiganj district, near the Bangladesh capital of Dhaka, the excavation is providing some valuable clues about the history of Atisa, …Continue reading →

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Archaeological finds suggest Yan’an fortification at least 2,300 years older

New discoveries at the Lushan Mao archaeological site in the Baota district of Yan’an in China’s Shaanxi province push the date of the Yan’an fortification complex back by at least 2,300 years. File photo shows a full view of Lushan Mao relics site, in Baota district of Yan’an of Shaanxi province [Credit: VCG]The “2017 Shaanxi provincial new archaeological discoveries seminar”, …Continue reading →

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