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January 26th, 2018

Cold spray 3D printing leads to new design possibilities in electric motor magnets

Researchers from the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) have developed a cold-spray additive manufacturing process for fabricating permanent magnets for electric motors. The process could lead to cost reductions and new design possibilities. via 3ders.org, http://www.3ders.org/articles/20180126-cold-spray-3d-printing-leads-to-new-design-possibilities-in-electric-motor-magnets.html

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CSU Sacramento Hornet Racing Formula SAE team uses 3D printing to improved engine performance

The pioneering work of California 3D printing expert Carbon is something that we’ve covered on a regular basis. The company introduced a line of 3D printers with its patented Digital Light Synthesis technology a few years ago, and has partnered with Adidas to develop a range of cutting-edge 3D printed sneakers, amongst other groundbreaking projects. via 3ders.org, http://www.3ders.org/articles/20180126-csu-sacramentos-hornet-racing-formula-sae-team-uses-3d-printing-to-improved-engine-performance.html

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Ancient Eurasian DNA sequencing is revealing links with modern humans

Until recently, very little was known about the genetic relationship between modern humans of the Upper Palaeolithic age (the period of time between 50,000 and 10,000 years ago, also called the Late Stone age) and today’s populations. But with direct DNA sequencing, researchers are discovering unexpected genetic connections between individuals on opposing sides of Eurasia. These suggest a complex history …Continue reading →

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Excavation confirms ruins of China’s largest Taoist temple

After a four-year excavation, archeologists have confirmed the location of China’s largest Taoist temple, built in the Song Dynasty (960-1279) and used continuously until it was destroyed by fire in 1930. Photos taken on Jan. 21, 2018 shows the site of the Great Shangqing Palace at the foot of Longhu Mountain in Yingtan,  east China’s Jiangxi Province. After a four-year …Continue reading →

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1,300-year-old imperial kitchen likely found in Nara

The remains of a huge kitchen dating to the latter half of the Nara Period (710-784) have apparently been unearthed here. The remains of a well, foreground, unearthed at the former site of the Toin district of the Heijo Imperial Palace, and ruins, background, which were likely part of a large cooking facility, are shown Dec. 21 in Nara [Credit: …Continue reading →

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Searching for the tomb of Tutankhamun’s wife Ankhesenamun

An Egyptian archaeological mission led by renowned Egyptologist Zahi Hawass began excavation work in the Valley of the Monkeys, a section of the Valley of the Kings on Luxor’s west bank, to search for an 18th Dynasty tomb “probably” of the wife of the boy king Tutankhamun, Ankhesenamun. Tutankhamun and his wife Ankhesenamun depicted in a scene on the gilt …Continue reading →

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Stoa of Philip V restoration under way on Delos

At the end of 2017, the three phases of the preliminary work being carried out under the three-year program for the restoration of the Stoa of Philip V were completed, the Greek Culture Ministry said. Credit: Greek Ministry of Culture and SportsThe program, with a total budget of 550,000 euros, is implemented by the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Cyclades …Continue reading →

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Archaeological excavations at the Khermen Tal site in Arkhangai Province, Mongolia

The Khermen Tal site is located in Ogiinuur Sum, Arkhangai Province, Mongolia. As one of the best preserved and largest ancient city groups in Mongolia, it contained three walled enclosures the remains of which lie side by side from east to west and have the same layout. Hence its name ‘Hudgiyn Denj’ or ‘Three Interconnected Cities’. Aerial photo of the …Continue reading →

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Primordial oceans had oxygen 250 million years before the atmosphere

Research by a University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD) graduate student Mojtaba Fakhraee and Associate Professor Sergei Katsev has pushed a major milestone in the evolution of Earth’s environment back by about 250 million years. While oxygen is believed to have first accumulated in Earth’s atmosphere around 2.45 billion years ago, new research shows that oceans contained plentiful oxygen long before …Continue reading →

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Modern human brain organization emerged only recently

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, reveal how and when the typical globular brain shape of modern humans evolved. Their analyses based on changes in endocranial size and shape in Homo sapiens fossils show that brain organization, and possibly brain function, evolved gradually within our species and unexpectedly reached modern conditions only recently. Brain …Continue reading →

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