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January 10th, 2018

Schaffen Watches launches new Reference 65 range of timepieces with customized 3D printed rotors

As fashion and technology trends evolve and grow, there’s still something distinguished and elegant about a quality, well-built wristwatch, and a timepiece that was personally designed is one of the most luxury products that a person can own. via 3ders.org, http://ift.tt/2Et0irR

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Chemists discover plausible recipe for early life on Earth

Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a fascinating new theory for how life on Earth may have begun. Chemists find key chemical reactions that support life today could have been carried out with ingredients  likely present on the planet four billion years ago [Credit: Richard Bizley/Science Source]Their experiments, described in the journal Nature Communications, demonstrate that key …Continue reading →

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In Antarctic dry valleys, early signs of climate change-induced shifts in soil

In a study spanning two decades, a team of researchers led by Colorado State University found declining numbers of soil fauna, nematodes and other animal species in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, one of the world’s driest and coldest deserts. This discovery is attributed to climate change, which has triggered melting and thawing of ice in this desert since an uncharacteristically …Continue reading →

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Unusual gene evolution in bacteria

University of Montana researchers have made another discovery at the cellular level to help understand the basic processes of all life on our planet — this time within the unusual bacteria that has lived inside cicada insects since dinosaurs roamed Earth. A Chilean cicada, which hosts particularly unusual symbiotic bacteria [Credit: Piotr Lukasik]During the past 70 million years, the bacteria …Continue reading →

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Study shows treeshrews break evolutionary ‘rules’

A new study has exposed the common treeshrew, a small and skittish mammal that inhabits the tropical forests of Southeast Asia, as an ecogeographical rule breaker. Credit: stock.adobe.com/Yale UniversityAccording to the study — published in the journal Ecology and Evolution — Tupaia glis, the common treeshrew, defies two widely tested rules that describe patterns of geographical variation within species: the …Continue reading →

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Swift parrots bred on predator-free islands at risk of extinction

New research from The Australian National University (ANU) has found genetic evidence that critically endangered swift parrots, which breed all over Tasmania and on predator-free islands, form a single nomadic population at high risk of extinction. Nomadic swift parrots breed across Tasmania wherever their food is most abundant. Critically endangered swift parrots [Credit: Australian National University]Dr Dejan Stojanovic from the… …Continue reading →

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Special star is a Rosetta Stone for understanding the sun’s variability and climate effect

The spots on the surface on the Sun come and go with an 11-year periodicity known as the solar cycle. The solar cycle is driven by the solar dynamo, which is an interplay between magnetic fields, convection and rotation. However, our understanding of the physics underlying the solar dynamo is far from complete. One example is the so-called Maunder Minimum, …Continue reading →

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Saturn’s moon Titan sports Earth-like features

Using the now-complete Cassini data set, Cornell astronomers have created a new global topographic map of Saturn’s moon Titan that has opened new windows into understanding its liquid flows and terrain. Two new papers, published Geophysical Review Letters, describe the map and discoveries arising from it. Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, has features that resemble Earth’s geology, with deep, steep-sided canyons  …Continue reading →

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Genomic data suggest two main migrations into Scandinavia after the last Ice Age

In a new study published in PLoS Biology, an international research team suggests Scandinavia was populated by two main migrations after the last glacial maximum: an initial migration of groups from the south (modern day Denmark and Germany) and an additional migration from the north-east, following the ice-free Atlantic coast. Skeletal fragments from the Hummervikholmen site [Credit: Beate Kjørslevik]After the …Continue reading →

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Chinese archaeologists restore 2,500-year-old ‘dragon bed’

After 17 years of effort, archeologists in southwest China’s Sichuan Province said Monday they have restored a “dragon bed” believed to be used by an ancient king 2,500 years ago. The bed, 2.55 meters long, 1.3 meters wide and 1.8 meters tall, is the oldest and the best-preserved lacquered bed ever unearthed in China, said Yang Tao, an assistant researcher …Continue reading →

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