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December 3rd, 2017

Copy of ‘Jesus’ secret revelations to his brother’ discovered by biblical scholars

The first-known original Greek copy of a heretical Christian writing describing Jesus’ secret teachings to his brother James has been discovered at Oxford University by biblical scholars at The University of Texas at Austin. A piece of the Coptic translation of the First Apocalypse of James from the Nag Hammadi Codex V [Credit: Nag Hammadi Library, Oxford University]To date, only a …Continue reading →

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Exceptionally preserved eggs and embryos reveal life history of a pterosaur

The pterosaur record is generally poor, and pterosaur eggs are even rarer. Only a handful of isolated occurrences of eggs and embryos have been reported so far. Three-dimensionally preserved eggs include one from Argentina and five reported from the Turpan-Hami Basin, Xinjiang, northwestern China in 2014. Our understanding of several biological questions, including their ontogenetic development and reproductive strategy for …Continue reading →

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15,000 year old ‘Venus’ figure discovered on Croatia’s Dugi Otok island

Archaeologists have discovered a 15.000 years old bone pendant carved in what appears to be the shape of a female figure while conducting excavations in Vlakno Cave on Croatia’s Dugi Otok island. Credit: Sveučilište u ZadruVlakno Cave, located in the middle of Dugi Otok, has a large entrance overlooking Rava island and a water spring nearby, making it an ideal …Continue reading →

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The Jena Experiment: Loss of species destroys ecosystems

How serious is the loss of species globally? Are material cycles in an ecosystem with few species changed? In order to find this out, the “Jena Experiment” was established in 2002, one of the largest biodiversity experiments worldwide. Professor Wolfgang Weisser from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) reports on two unexpected findings of the long-term study: Biodiversity influences almost …Continue reading →

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Sea level rise predicted to threaten more than 13,000 archaeological sites in southeastern US

Sea-level rise may impact vast numbers of archaeological and historic sites, cemeteries, and landscapes on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the southeastern United States, according to a study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Anderson from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA, and colleagues. Flooded moat in the grounds of Castillo de San Marcos in the …Continue reading →

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New interpretation of the Red Queen’s Hypothesis: It’s about expansion

In a new publication in the journal Nature, Indre Zliobaite and Mikael Fortelius from the University of Helsinki and Nils Christian Stenseth from the University of Oslo present a new interpretation of one of the classic theories of evolutionary theory, the Red Queen’s Hypothesis, proposed by Leigh Van Valen in 1973. This is the Red Queen walking randomly [Credit: Ika …Continue reading →

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Traces of life on nearest exoplanets may be hidden in equatorial trap

New simulations show that the search for life on other planets may well be more difficult than previously assumed, in research published today in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. The study indicates that unusual air flow patterns could hide atmospheric components from telescopic observations, with direct consequences for formulating the optimal strategy for searching for (oxygen-producing) …Continue reading →

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Famed Libyan ruins rely on locals for support

The limestone and marble ruins of Leptis Magna on Libya’s coast could be a hive of activity and a top tourist destination, but conflict has left one of ancient Rome’s great Mediterranean cities almost entirely cut off from the outside world. Credit: Reuters/Ahmed JadallahGuards are unpaid and most visitors are local, with only the occasional handful of foreigners, including one …Continue reading →

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Heartbits project uses 3D printed models & VR to show patients their heart defects

Students from three Dutch universities have developed “Heartbits,” a 3D printing and virtual reality (VR) tool for visually explaining heart defects to patients. Heartbits was initially a VR project developed with a Microsoft Hololens headset, but now also includes 3D printed models. via 3ders.org, http://ift.tt/2AoGSFB

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Time between world-changing volcanic super-eruptions less than previously thought

After analysing a database of geological records dated within the last 100,000 years, a team of scientists from the University of Bristol has discovered the average time between so-called volcanic super-eruptions is actually much less than previously thought. The Toba caldera – the site of a massive super-eruption 75,000 years ago  [Credit: NASA/METI/AIST/Japan Space Systems, and U.S./ Japan ASTER Science …Continue reading →

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