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October 24th, 2017

AMT-SPECAVIA builds Europes first habitable 3D printed building

AMT-SPECAVIA, a Moscow-based group of machining and 3D printing companies, says it has built Europe’s first habitable 3D printed house. The residence, located in Yaroslavl and reportedly spanning almost 300 square meters, may also be Europe’s largest 3D printed building. via 3ders.org, http://ift.tt/2gBRq9f

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Meet the Welsh woman with the first 3D printed jaw in the world

A woman from Swansea in Wales has become the first person in the world to be fitted with a 3D printed jaw. Retail worker Debbie Hawkins had developed a tumour in her lower jawbone that was growing at an alarmingly fast rate, to the point of nearly breaking the bone. After a lengthy consultation process at Swansea’s Morriston Hospital, it …Continue reading →

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3D Printing News Roundup: NYU 3D printed tumor study, Norsk Titanium wins award, MIT uses Aether 1 bioprinter

In today’s 3D printing roundup you’ll see news from NYU and Stratasys, metal 3D printing company Norsk Titanium, and bioprinter manufacturer Aether, whose Aether 1 is being used by MIT researchers. via 3ders.org, http://ift.tt/2zKmxYR

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Moment of impact: A journey into the Chicxulub Crater

When the Chicxulub asteroid slammed into Earth about 66 million years ago, it obliterated 80 percent of Earth’s species, blasted out a crater 200 kilometers across, and signaled an abrupt end to the Cretaceous Period. The impact, its catastrophic effects, and its aftermath have engrossed scientists and the public alike since it was first discovered. Artist’s impression of what the …Continue reading →

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Scientists develop new theory of molecular evolution

Researchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and the University College London have developed a new theory of molecular evolution, offering insights into how genes function, how the rates of evolutionary divergence can be predicted, and how harmful mutations arise at a basic level. Credit: Uppsala University”Molecules are the basis of all life and we wanted to find …Continue reading →

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The atmospheres of water worlds

There are currently about fifty known exoplanets with diameters that range from Mars-sized to several times the Earth’s and that also reside within their stars’ habitable zone – the orbital range within which their surface temperatures permit water to remain liquid. A “water world” is an extreme case, an exoplanet defined as being covered by a deep ocean, perhaps as …Continue reading →

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Mongolian microfossils point to the rise of animals on Earth

A Yale-led research team has discovered a cache of embryo-like microfossils in northern Mongolia that may shed light on questions about the long-ago shift from microbes to animals on Earth. Assorted microfossils from the Ediacaran Khesen Formation, Mongolia. Each fossil is on the order  of 200 microns maximum dimension [Credit: Yale University]Called the Khesen Formation, the site is one of …Continue reading →

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World’s oldest trees reveal complex anatomy

The first trees to have ever grown on Earth were also the most complex, new research has revealed. Fossils from a 374-million-year-old tree found in north-west China have revealed an interconnected web of woody strands within the trunk of the tree that is much more intricate than that of the trees we see around us today. Illustrative transverse plane through …Continue reading →

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Life goes on for marine ecosystems after cataclysmic mass extinction

One of the largest global mass extinctions did not fundamentally change marine ecosystems, scientists have found. Blocks from ammonite pavement bed [Credit © The Trustees of the Natural History Museum, London]An international team of scientists, including Dr Alex Dunhill from the University of Leeds, has found that although the mass extinction in the Late Triassic period wiped out the vast …Continue reading →

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Logged tropical rainforests still support biodiversity even when the heat is on

Tropical rainforests continue to buffer wildlife from extreme temperatures even after logging, a new study has revealed. Wallace’s flying frog [Credit: University of Sheffield: Rebecca Senior]Scientists had previously assumed that cutting down trees caused major changes to local climates within tropical forests — something which would have a devastating effect on the animals living there. However, new research conducted by …Continue reading →

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