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October 15th, 2017

Genes responsible for diversity of human skin colours identified

Human populations feature a broad palette of skin tones. But until now, few genes have been shown to contribute to normal variation in skin color, and these had primarily been discovered through studies of European populations. A Penn-led team identified new genes associated with skin color variations. Their study of more than 2,000 Africans from  diverse ethnic backgrounds sheds light …Continue reading →

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Devourer of planets? Astronomers dub star ‘Kronos’

In mythology, the Titan Kronos devoured his children, including Poseidon (better known as the planet Neptune), Hades (Pluto) and three daughters. Sun-like star Kronos shows signs of having ingested 15 Earth masses worth of rocky planets, prompting Princeton  astronomers to nickname it for the Titan who ate his young. This artist’s rendering of the diverse rocky planets  in our galaxy …Continue reading →

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Gold coin sheds new light on 5th century Swedish island massacre

The discovery of gold rings and coins on a Swedish island sheds new light on the history of the area, and could give insight into the motives for a massacre which took place in the fifth century, archaeologists told The Local on Wednesday. The coin and gold rings in situ [Credit: Daniel Lindskog]The team working at Sandby Borg, a ringfort …Continue reading →

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Inca citadel remains found in Cusco

A group of Peru’s southern rainforest inhabitants claim to have found impressive archaeological remains of the Inca civilization in Cusco. Andina PhotoJoined by local authorities, villagers headed to La Convencion Provincial Municipality in order to report the find. Andina PhotoAccording to locals, remains were found on September 9 while grazing animals near the Megantoni National Sanctuary. Andina PhotoPresented as evidence, …Continue reading →

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Astronomers discover unusual spindle-like galaxies

Galaxies are majestic, rotating wheels of stars? Not in the case of the spindle-like galaxies studied by Athanasia Tsatsi (Max Planck Institute for Astronomy) and her colleagues. Using the CALIFA survey, the astronomers found that these slender galaxies, which rotate along their longest axis, are much more common than previously thought. The new data allowed the astronomers to create a …Continue reading →

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Sculptures found in ancient city of Pisidia Antiokheia

Five sculptures of gods and goddesses have been found in the sanctuary of Mēn Askaenos in the ancient city of Pisidia Antiokheia in Turkey. AA PhotoExcavations close to the ancient city, located in the southern province of Isparta’s Yalvaç district, unearthed the five intact sculptures in one of the previously unearthed prestigious chambers. AA PhotoExcavations head Professor Mehmet Özhanlı said …Continue reading →

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5 fun DIY 3D printing projects – elephant shot dispenser, emergency button, cable 3D printer, LED lamp, water droplet automaton

You can’t spell additive manufacturing without fun, and in these dark times a little 3D printing wackiness could do us all some good. So here’s a round-up of five recent DIY projects, that probably won’t rival anything Airbus or 3DSystems has to offer, but they’ve got their own unique amateurish charm to spare. A 3D printed elephant that serves drinks? …Continue reading →

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One of planet’s largest volcanic eruptions

Washington State University researchers have determined that the Pacific Northwest was home to one of the Earth’s largest known volcanic eruptions, a millennia-long spewing of sulfuric gas that blocked out the sun and cooled the planet. The Palouse River in southeastern Washington State drops nearly 200 feet through cliffs of basalt created by scores  of lava flows 10 to 16 …Continue reading →

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Risk of tsunamis in Mediterranean Sea has been overstated

A review of geological evidence for tsunamis during the past 4500 years in the Mediterranean Sea has revealed that as many as 90 per cent of these inundation events may have been misinterpreted by scientists and were due to storm activity instead. The boulders on the Tipaza coast of Algeria that would have been deposited in a high-energy event  [Credit: …Continue reading →

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Scientists discover one of the most luminous ‘new stars’ ever

Astronomers have today announced that they have discovered possibly the most luminous ‘new star’ ever — a nova discovered in the direction of one of our closest neighboring galaxies: The Small Magellanic Cloud. Left: the nova system before eruption. Right: the nova system in outburst [Credit: OGLE survey]Astronomers from the University of Leicester contributed to the discovery by using the …Continue reading →

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