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John's blog on Art, Technology, design and more!

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October 8th, 2017

Win een Micro:Bit – Abonneer op ons kanaal en reageer! (zie mancave.conrad.nl)

De Micro:Bit is een soort van Arduino, maar ook weer niet helemaal. Programmeren gaat via het web en is veel gemakkelijker te leren dan Arduino zelf. Daarom is het ideaal voor scholen en leerinstellingen. In de video laat Freek zien wat de Micro:Bit allemaal kan en hoe je er in theorie een smarthome mee zou kunnen bouwen. #expeditiemicrobit En nu …Continue reading →

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IN(3D)USTRY 2017 Report: Norbert Martin Olivares of SEAT gives talk on its evolving 3D printing strategy

The automobile industry had a major presence at this year’s IN(3D)USTRY conference in Barcelona, with a broad range of vehicle manufacturers, parts suppliers and service providers getting together to discuss their use of 3D printing and hopefully matching up some needs with some solutions. via 3ders.org, http://ift.tt/2z6wDmh

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New NASA study shows moon once had an atmosphere

A new study shows that an atmosphere was produced around the ancient Moon, 3 to 4 billion years ago, when intense volcanic eruptions spewed gases above the surface faster than they could escape to space. The study was published in Earth and Planetary Science Letters. Artistic impression of the Moon, looking over the Imbrium Basin, with lavas erupting, venting gases,  …Continue reading →

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The super-Earth that came home for dinner

It might be lingering bashfully on the icy outer edges of our solar system, hiding in the dark, but subtly pulling strings behind the scenes: stretching out the orbits of distant bodies, perhaps even tilting the entire solar system to one side. An artist’s illustration of a possible ninth planet in our solar system, hovering at the edge of our …Continue reading →

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An unexpected phenomenon observed in merger of galaxy clusters

An international team of astronomers led by Francesco de Gasperin (Leiden University, the Netherlands) has witnessed an unexpected phenomenon in a merger of a two clusters of galaxies. The astronomers discovered a gas trail that slowly extinguished, but then lit up again. It is unclear where the energy for the rejuvenation of this trail comes from. The researchers publish their …Continue reading →

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Magma chambers of supervolcanoes have sponge-like structure

Supervolcanoes are superlative in every respect. The eruption of the Toba caldera in modern-day Indonesia approximately 74,000 years ago was so powerful that it led to a period of global cooling and, possibly, a drastic fall in the population of humankind. Around 2.1 million years ago, the first of three eruptions of the Yellowstone supervolcano in the USA formed a …Continue reading →

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Genome analysis of early plant lineage sheds light on how plants learned to thrive on land

Though it’s found around the world, it’s easy to overlook the common liverwort — the plant can fit in the palm of one’s hand and appears to be composed of flat, overlapping leaves. Despite their unprepossessing appearance, these plants without roots or vascular tissues for nutrient transport are living links to the transition from the algae that found its way …Continue reading →

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Research rethinks the evolutionary importance of variability in a population

It’s been long thought that variability within a population is key to population’s growth and survival but new research questions that assumption. Researchers find that low cellular growth rate variability leads to an increase in population growth  in single-cell organisms [Credit: Harvard University]Ariel Amir, Assistant Professor in Applied Mathematics at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied …Continue reading →

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A win-win for spotted owls and forest management

Remote sensing technology has detected what could be a win for both spotted owls and forestry management, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis, the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station and the University of Washington. Tall trees, not overall tree canopy, are main habitat requirement for spotted owl  [Credit: Getty Images]For 25 years, many …Continue reading →

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In Iceland stream, possible glimpse of warming future

The findings carry implications for life in a warming climate as the experiment shows mobile organisms should fare better than those adapted to cooler temperatures unable to disperse. A research group, that includes Dr. Jon Benstead (above), is attempting to determine some of the potential impacts  a warming world will have on freshwater environments [Credit: The University of Alabama]”As we …Continue reading →

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