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September 12th, 2017

Ceramic Constellation Pavilion: New Hong Kong pavilion incorporates over 2,000 3D printed bricks

A massive architecture pavilion in Hong Kong is reaching new heights in the possibilities of 3D printing and robotic technology. Spearheaded by the University of Hong Kong’s (HKU) Faculty of Architecture in collaboration with Sino Group property developers, the ‘Ceramic Constellation Pavilion’ is a winding edifice made up of over 3D printed 2,000 bricks, the first of its kind in …Continue reading →

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Ricoh to replace metal tools with Stratasys 3D printed customized, lightweight equivalents

3D printing giant Stratasys’ influence on the manufacturing world is continuing to grow, as it provides a broad range of impressive additive solutions tailor-made for companies in a huge variety of sectors. The latest company to take advantage of its groundbreaking work is office electronics manufacturer Ricoh. via 3ders.org, http://ift.tt/2gZK1UU

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The enigma of early Norwegian iron production

Ancient Norwegians made top-quality iron. But where did the knowledge to make this iron come from? A professor emeritus from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology may have solved this riddle. Where did the expertise to smelt iron ore come from? And how did it actually get to Norway to begin with?  [Credit: Colourbox]For centuries, people in Norway’s Trøndelag …Continue reading →

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Clay-based Laponite bioink suitable for 3D bioprinting scaffolds with optimal drug delivery

Within the field of bioprinting, the potential benefits of using clay-based printing materials are becoming increasingly apparent. As a recent research project by a team from the University of Southampton and the Technische Universitat Dresden in Germany has shown, certain types of clay can enable the bioprinting of human stem cells. via 3ders.org, http://ift.tt/2wn0G6X

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When ancient fossil DNA isn’t available, ancient glycans may help trace human evolution

Ancient DNA recovered from fossils is a valuable tool to study evolution and anthropology. Yet ancient fossil DNA from earlier geological ages has not been found yet in any part of Africa, where it’s destroyed by extreme heat and humidity. In a potential first step at overcoming this hurdle, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and …Continue reading →

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Scientists track the brain – skull transition from dinosaurs to birds

The dramatic, dinosaur-to-bird transition that occurred in reptiles millions of years ago was accompanied by profound changes in the skull roof of those animals — and holds important clues about the way the skull forms in response to changes in the brain — according to a new study. These are CT scan images of the skull roof (front bone in …Continue reading →

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The evolutionary origin of the gut

How did the gut, the skin and musculature evolve? This question concerns scientists for more than a century. Through the investigation of the embryonic development of sea anemones, a very old animal lineage, researchers from the University of Vienna have now come to conclusions which challenge the 150 year-old hypothesis of the homology (common evolutionary origin) of the germ layers …Continue reading →

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Half-a-billion-year-old fossils shed light animal evolution on Earth

Scientists have discovered traces of life more than half-a-billion years old that could change the way we think about how all animals evolved on earth. X-ray microtomography image of trace fossil in sediment [Credit: Luke Parry, University of Bristol]The international team, including palaeontologist from The University of Manchester, found a new set of trace fossils left by some of the …Continue reading →

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First primates were built for leaping, fossil ankle suggests

A 52-million-year-old ankle fossil suggests our prehuman ancestors were high-flying acrobats. These first primates spent most of their time in the trees rather than on the ground, but just how nimble they were as they moved around in the treetops has been a topic of dispute. This tiny ankle bone belonged to one of the earliest members of the primate …Continue reading →

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3D Printing News Roundup: Solvay, Verbatim, Robo 3D, Siemens

Today’s 3D printing roundup includes news from Belgium, where chemicals company Solvay has announced plans to produce PEKK polymers for 3D printing in the US. Elsewhere, Germany’s Verbatim has a new TPEE material, while Robo 3D is raising money for a 3D printer pre-order pipeline. via 3ders.org, http://ift.tt/2w4KYSl

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