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John's blog on Art, Technology, design and more!

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September 9th, 2017

Newly discovered tomb with several mummies. Tomb Kampp -390 in Dra Abu El Naga, West Bank, Luxor.

via YouTube Capture Read the full article here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-Y16pk6Sjs

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Ruim drieduizend jaar oude graftombe van goudsmid ontdekt in Egypte

De Egyptische minister van Oudheden Khaled Al-Anani zegt zaterdag dat de graftombe dateert uit de tijd van de achttiende dynastie van het oude Egypte. De vondst van het graf is de laatste in een rij dit jaar. Read the full article here: http://ift.tt/2vW3NHk

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3D printed concrete dome structure is officially opened in Aarhus Harbour, Denmark

3D printing technology is being increasingly investigated as a way to develop the construction industry, with its huge potential for improved automation offering a vision of more efficient and imaginative building sites in the future, responding to some of the more demanding architectural problems around the world. via 3ders.org, http://ift.tt/2eVeKlm

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Shocking discovery explains powerful novae

In a typical year, there are around 50 novae, nuclear explosions on the surface of white dwarf stars, in our galaxy. Some of these explosions are so bright and powerful, they exceed the scale of scientific explanation. An MSU-led team of scientists has found that gamma rays are emitted from a stellar explosion known as a nova.  Where and how …Continue reading →

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Genome of threatened northern spotted owl assembed

A charismatic owl iconic to Pacific Coast forests is no longer ruling the roost, and scientists now have another tool for understanding its decline. Researchers have assembled the California Academy of Sciences’ first-ever animal genome after sequencing the DNA of the northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina). In collaboration with the University of California Berkeley (UC Berkeley), University of California …Continue reading →

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‘Bee’ informed: Public interest exceeds understanding in bee conservation

Many people have heard bee populations are declining due to such threats as colony collapse disorder, pesticides and habitat loss. And many understand bees are critical to plant pollination. Yet, according to a study led by Utah State University ecologist Joseph Wilson, few are aware of the wide diversity of bees and other pollinators beyond such species as honeybees. Which …Continue reading →

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‘Extreme’ telescopes find the second-fastest-spinning pulsar

By following up on mysterious high-energy sources mapped out by NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, the Netherlands-based Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) radio telescope has identified a pulsar spinning at more than 42,000 revolutions per minute, making it the second-fastest known. The Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), a network of thousands of linked radio antennas, primarily located  in the Netherlands, has discovered two …Continue reading →

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Discovery of boron on Mars adds to evidence for habitability

The discovery of boron on Mars gives scientists more clues about whether life could have ever existed on the planet, according to a paper published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. A selfie of the NASA Curiosity rover at the Murray Buttes in Gale Crater, Mars, a location where boron  was found in light-toned calcium sulfate veins [Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS]”Because borates …Continue reading →

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Large-scale study of genetic data shows humans still evolving

In a study analyzing the genomes of 210,000 people in the United States and Britain, researchers at Columbia University find that the genetic variants linked to Alzheimer’s disease and heavy smoking are less frequent in people with longer lifespans, suggesting that natural selection is weeding out these unfavorable variants in both populations. Researchers have found a drop in some harmful …Continue reading →

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Could Trappist-1’s seven earth-like planets have gas giant siblings?

New work from a team of Carnegie scientists (and one Carnegie alumnus) asked whether any gas giant planets could potentially orbit TRAPPIST-1 at distances greater than that of the star’s seven known planets. If gas giant planets are found in this system’s outer edges, it could help scientists understand how our own Solar System’s gas giants like Jupiter and Saturn …Continue reading →

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