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September 1st, 2017

3D printing poised to explode in wind turbine industry

As the wind turbine industry picks up speed, one CEO is bracing himself for a bright future the likes of which we’ve never seen before. Imagine a wind turbine nacelle made of structural fabric—yes, fabric—or blades complete with metal mesh inserts. via 3ders.org, http://ift.tt/2gqjfkE

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Dassault Systèmes develops new online marketplace for manufacturers using 3D printing

Dassault Systèmes has become a major player in the 3D printing industry over the last decade, mostly due to its advanced 3D design software as well as the useful integration of design, simulation and production tools provided by its 3DExperience platform. A productive collaboration with Airbus has also seen the French company at the forefront of 3D printing’s expansion into …Continue reading →

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UK scientist developing 3D printed optical fibers for better data transmission systems

Angeles Camacho Rosales, a postgraduate research student at the University of Southampton’s Optoelectronics Research Centre in the UK, is developing ways to 3D print glass for optical fibers that could lead to improved data transmission systems. via 3ders.org, http://ift.tt/2gv4oJq

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Completion of second phase of underwater research at Ambelakia in Salamis

The Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports announced the completion of the second phase of interdisciplinary underwater research on the east coast of Salamis. Research has evolved, at an intensive pace, in a marine area of major historical importance: a) The Ambelakia bay, a port of the Classical city of Salamis controlled by the Athenian state and primary meeting point …Continue reading →

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Fossil footprints found on Greek island of Crete challenge established theories of human evolution

Newly discovered human-like footprints from Crete may put the established narrative of early human evolution to the test. The footprints are approximately 5.7 million years old and were made at a time when previous research puts our ancestors in Africa — with ape-like feet. The footprints were discovered by Gerard Gierlinski  by chance when he was on holiday on Crete …Continue reading →

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‘Tsunami-sunk’ Roman ruins discovered in Tunisia

Vast underwater Roman ruins have been discovered off northeast Tunisia, apparently confirming a theory that the city of Neapolis was partly submerged by a tsunami in the 4th century AD. Archaeologists diving off the coast of Nabeul in northeastern Tunisia at the site of the ancient Roman city  of Neapolis [Credit: AFP/HO/National Heritage Institute Tunisia/University of Sassari]”It’s a major discovery,” …Continue reading →

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Stalagmite reveals age of human bones in south Mexico as 13,000 years old

A prehistoric human skeleton found on the Yucatán Peninsula is at least 13,000 years old and most likely dates from a glacial period at the end of the most recent ice age, the late Pleistocene. A German-Mexican team of researchers led by Prof. Dr Wolfgang Stinnesbeck and Arturo González González has now dated the fossil skeleton based on a stalagmite …Continue reading →

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How Neanderthals made the very first glue

The world’s oldest known glue was made by Neanderthals. But how did they make it 200,000 years ago? Leiden archaeologists have discovered three possible ways. A Neanderthal spear is predominantly made up of two parts, a piece of flint for the point, and a stick for the shaft. But one  aspect is often overlooked, and has recently been puzzling archaeologists: …Continue reading →

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Ancient geometric earthworks in south­western Amazonia were important ritual communication spaces

Researchers examine pre-colonial geometric earthworks in the southwestern Amazonia from the point of view of indigenous peoples and archaeology. The study shows that the earthworks were once important ritual communication spaces. Jacó Sá and Seu Chiquinho sites featuring circular, square, and U-shaped earthworks. Geometric patterns  provided people with qualities such as knowledge and power [Credit: Sanna Saunaluoma]The geometric… [[ This …Continue reading →

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Neanderthal site of Abric Romaní yields more than 12,000 remains of fauna and stone tools

Neanderthal groups occupied the Abric Romaní Q level (Capellades, Barcelona) over 60,000 years and left there important demonstrations of their daily activities. This is showed by the remains found during the excavation that IPHES (Catalan Institute of Human Paleoecology and Social Evolution) has developed since August 8th. This field campaign was the 35th at the site and was directed by …Continue reading →

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