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September, 2017

French woman suffering from gunshot wound receives 3D printed reverse shoulder prosthesis

One lucky patient in France has become one of the first to sport a 3D printed shoulder implant following an almost deadly accident. Nathalie Dufaut Danjon was shot with a hunting rifle a little over two years ago, a near-fatal accident that saw a bullet penetrate her shoulder joint through the front, and exit through the back of her shoulder …Continue reading →

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Brother’s Latest Scanners Hasten Digital Transformation

The new ADS-2200 and ADS-2700W scanners allow small businesses to quickly transition to efficient digital workloads. via http://ift.tt/N4vBNq, http://ift.tt/2xEQ0oB

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The volatile processes that shaped Earth

Oxford University scientists have shed new light on how Earth was first formed. Based on observations of newly-forming stars, scientists know that the solar system began as a disc of dust and gas surrounding the centrally-growing sun. The gas condensed to solids which accumulated into larger rocky bodies like asteroids and mini-planets. Over a period of 100 million years these …Continue reading →

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3D Printing News Roundup: Encode Ring, Minifab resin 3D printer, Airwolf 3D, Cooksongold and Boltenstern

Here’s another 3D printing news roundup, in case anything passed you by recently. The latest developments include a new resin 3D printer, a 3D printed jewellery collection, and much more besides. via 3ders.org, http://ift.tt/2x2Xq5A

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Modern humans emerged more than 300,000 years ago new study suggests

A genomic analysis of ancient human remains from KwaZulu-Natal revealed that southern Africa has an important role to play in writing the history of humankind. A research team from Uppsala University, Sweden, the Universities of Johannesburg and the Witwatersrand, South Africa, presents their results in the journal Science. The Florisbad skull [Credit: John Hawks]The team sequenced the genomes of seven …Continue reading →

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Earliest evidence for a native African cultigen discovered in Eastern Sudan

Archaeologists examining plant impressions within broken pottery have discovered the earliest evidence for domesticated sorghum in Africa. The evidence comes from an archaeological site (known as KG23) in eastern Sudan, dating from 3500 to 3000 BC, and is associated with an ancient archaeological culture known as the Butana Group. Sorghum bicolor [Credit: Flickr, Dinesh Valke]Sorghum is a native African grass …Continue reading →

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Isotopic analyses link the lives of Late Neolithic individuals to burial location in Spain

An isotopic analysis of megalithic graves and caves in Spain may suggest the existence of a degree of differentiation in the lifeways of people buried in these different funerary sites, according to a study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Teresa Fernández-Crespo and Rick Schulting from the University of the Basque Country, Spain, and the University of Oxford, …Continue reading →

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Lost continent of Zealandia: Scientists return from expedition to sunken land

After a nine-week voyage to study the lost, submerged continent of Zealandia in the South Pacific, a team of 32 scientists from 12 countries has arrived in Hobart, Tasmania, aboard the research vessel JOIDES Resolution. Did scientists find Zealandia beneath the waves? Their two-month expedition was a success  [Credit: IODP/JSRO/Tim Fulton]Researchers affiliated with the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) mounted …Continue reading →

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The drying of peatlands is reducing bird diversity

A recent international study indicates that the populations of peatland birds in Finland, Sweden, Norway, Estonia and Latvia have decreased by a third during the past three decades. The situation in Finland is the most dire, and the species in most trouble is the Finnish ruff, as the population has fallen to approximately 3% of what it was at the …Continue reading →

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Some marine species more vulnerable to climate change than others

Certain marine species will fare much worse than others as they become more vulnerable to the effects of climate change, a new UBC study has found. Researchers analyzed the biological characteristics of 1,074 and found that the species most at-risk include the Eastern  Australian salmon, yellowbar angelfish, toli shad, sohal surgeonfish and spotted grouper [Credit: UBC]After analyzing the biological characteristics …Continue reading →

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