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August 6th, 2017

This flexible, expandable 3D printed dress adapts to your body’s movement

Houston-based designer Maria Alejandra Mora-Sanchez is paving the way for 3D printed textiles with the launch of a new fashion garment in partnership with Cosine Additive. Mora-Sanchez may be new to the world of 3D printed fashion – the young maker is currently in the midst of an industrial design degree at the University of Houston via 3ders.org, http://ift.tt/2ug34jA

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Levi is experimenting with 3D printed denim

Levi’s denim company is sharply redefining its “tried and true” branding, with a new turn towards 3D printing technology. Back in February, the classic denim company made headlines with a spotlight in Fast Company via 3ders.org, http://ift.tt/2uwveC2

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Puzzling pockets of rock deep in Earth’s mantle explained

A team led by geoscientists from Arizona State University and Michigan State University has used computer modeling to explain how pockets of mushy rock accumulate at the boundary between Earth’s core and mantle. Tiny regions of compositionally distinct rock (red material, known as ultra-low velocity zones), collect at Earth’s  core-mantle boundary (tan surface), nearly halfway to the center of our …Continue reading →

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Hubble detects exoplanet with glowing water atmosphere

Scientists have found the strongest evidence to date for a stratosphere on an enormous planet outside our solar system, with an atmosphere hot enough to boil iron. This artist’s concept shows hot Jupiter WASP-121b, which presents the best evidence yet of a stratosphere on an exoplanet  [Credit: Engine House VFX, At-Bristol Science Centre, University of Exeter]An international team of researchers, …Continue reading →

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New simulations could help in hunt for massive mergers of neutron stars, black holes

Now that scientists can detect the wiggly distortions in space-time created by the merger of massive black holes, they are setting their sights on the dynamics and aftermath of other cosmic duos that unify in catastrophic collisions. This image, from a computerized simulation, shows the formation of an inner disk of matter and a wide,  hot disk of matter 5.5 …Continue reading →

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Early modern humans consumed more plants than Neanderthals but ate very little fish

Senckenberg scientists have studied the diet of anatomically modern humans. With their recent study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, they were able to refute the theory that the diet of early representatives of Homo sapiens was more flexible than that of Neanderthals. Just like the Neanderthals, our ancestors had mainly mammoth and plants on their plates — the researchers …Continue reading →

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9th century residence of nobleman found in Kyoto

The remnants of a large ninth-century mansion likely belonging to a high-ranking nobleman have been discovered in Kyoto. A researcher points to a section that is believed to have been a kitchen of a ninth-century mansion in Kyoto  [Credit: Yoshiko Sato]The mansion, measuring 21 meters east to west and 9 meters north to south, makes it one of the largest …Continue reading →

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Tracking the giant Antarctic iceberg

The largest remaining ice shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula lost 10% of its area when an iceberg four times the size of London broke free earlier this month. View of the A68 iceberg from a European Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellite image acquired on July 30, 2017  [Credit: A. Fleming, British Antarctic Survey]Since the 12 July 2017 breakaway Dr Anna Hogg, from …Continue reading →

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Archaeological excavations to resume at ancient site of Lagina in SW Turkey

Archaeologist are set to resume excavations after a six-year hiatus in the 3,000-year-old site of Lagina, the sacred precinct of the Goddess Hekate. View across the ruins of Lagina [Credit: AA]Modern excavation and restoration work began 1993 under the guidance of the Muğla Museum and with an international team advised by Professor Ahmet Tırpan from Pamukkale University. The fresh excavations …Continue reading →

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Origin of human genus not in response to climate change claims new study

An often cited claim that humans, who are smarter and more technologically advanced than their ancestors, originated in response to climate change is challenged in a new report by a Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology researcher at George Washington University. Hominid fossil skulls [Credit: Smithsonian’s Human Origins Program]Many scientists have argued that an influx, described as a …Continue reading →

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